FIS Plays Robin Hood, Takes (Prize) Money From Winners, Gives To Distant Runners-Up

FIS Plays Robin Hood, Takes (Prize) Money From Winners, Gives To Distant Runners-Up

Leaders, Newsfeed
While skiing fans were busy discussing proposed changes to programs of the Ski World Championships, elite skiers themselves were closely studying new FIS pay charts – with many stars not liking the changes. In the recent years, a winner of the race in World Cup received EUR 13.000 – it will now be reduced to EUR 8700. A runner-up was to take home EUR 8700 – now it's EUR 6500 instead. It would become much less rewarding to win the Tour de Ski series : a winner of the grueling multi-day race will be entitled to half as much compared to what it used it be – EUR 47.700 vs 84.800! A second-placed athlete will also lose circa 10 thousand Euros. https://www.instagram.com/p/BPAmyOFAYa9/ So, where did all the money go? Well,…
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Charlotta Kalla, Swedish Ski Federation – And 205.000 Swedish Kronor Between Them

Charlotta Kalla, Swedish Ski Federation – And 205.000 Swedish Kronor Between Them

Money & Finance, Newsfeed
The standoff between the Sweden's best skier and the Swedish Ski Federation over bonuses for the last season seems to continue. It also lifts the veil of relative secrecy over rarely discussed system of remuneration in cross skiing at the elite level. It is revealed that the Swedish Ski Federation promised its athletes SEK 150.000 bonus for gold, 60.000 for silver and 30.000 for bronze at the World Championships in Lahti. Charlotta Kalla won silver in 10km race and came 3d in  15 km  skiathlon – as well as being instrumental in winning the silver for Team Sweden in 4 X 5 relay in Lahti this year. That should have made her entitled to SEK 105.000 ( circa EUR 11.000) in bonus money. Except that the Federation is now refusing to…
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Poll: Majority Of Norwegians No Longer Believe In Doping-Free Skiing

Poll: Majority Of Norwegians No Longer Believe In Doping-Free Skiing

Leaders, Newsfeed
Only 49 percent of Norwegians believe that domestic cross-country skiers are completely doping-free according to the latest poll conducted by Ipsos for the Norway's Dagbladet newspaper This is a marked decrease of trust since the similar survey was done in 2014 by Ipsos MMI/ Dagbladet when 65 percent say that doping in domestic cross country skiing occurs "vary rarely or never". There is no big mystery as to why the public attitude in the world's most skiing country gone decidedly more sour – in the wake of asthma case against Martin Johnsrud Sundby and the doping case against Therese Johaug it would be expected. Just a quick reminder - neither admitted to taking certain medications to enhance performance, both claimed "innocence of intent" - whether the public believed them or…
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